Rural Corridor Trail

This cross-section illustrates a trail that is parallel to, but separated from, a roadway in order to utilize the open space of rural settings. The trail meanders and follows contours in the terrain and arrives at vistas and viewpoints. Both horizontal and vertical separation from the roadway are important to creating a user experience that is relieved of roadway noise. Design elements and spacing create a pleasant user experience for people on the corridor on foot, bike, or horse. Paved paths are to be provided for pedestrians and bicyclists, and dirt paths for pedestrians seeking a softer tread and people on horseback. Trees can be used to help create separation and create view corridors and shade opportunities. It is important that trees be set back from equestrian users.

Figure 14. Sample Rural Corridor Trail Section

Figure 14. Sample Rural Corridor Trail Section

Greenway Corridor Trail

The intent of this trail cross-section is to show various types of trails that are separated within a linear park or “Greenway”. When buildings line greenways it is important to create activation and “eyes” on the corridor with outdoor dining, benches, tables, and storefronts. Such activation enhances visibility and safety for trail users.

Figure 15. Sample Greenway Corridor Trail Section

Figure 15. Sample Greenway Corridor Trail Section

Urban Corridor Trail

The cross-section separates motorist users from other users. Tree lined roadways and trails help define the corridors and provide shade. The Urban Corridor Trail provides a greater variety of destinations like cafes and stores. It is essential that the urban pathway be legible to users moving from more rural areas. This section shows a distinct hike-bike pathway and a possible equestrian pathway.

Figure 16. Sample Urban Corridor Trail Section