Regional Circulation Corridors

Avenues: 2nd Ave. and  California Ave.

An avenue is a walkable, low-speed street that carries a mixture of through-going and local traffic. Avenues provide access to abutting commercial, residential, and mixed land uses, and accommodate cars, pedestrians, and cyclists. Avenues may have between two and four travel lanes, on-street parking, some form of on- or off-street bicycle facilities, and sidewalks on both sides of the street. Avenues may have planted medians, side planting strips, and a more formal planting scheme. Target speeds for avenues are typically 30 mph or less.

Figure 2. Avenue Sample 1: Protected Bike Lanes Street Section.


Figure 3. Avenue Sample 2: Protected Cycle Track and Multi-Lane Street Section.

Figure 3. Avenue Sample 2: Protected Cycle Track and Multi-Lane Street Section.

Boulevards: Lightfighter Dr., Gigling Rd., General Jim Moore Blvd., and Imjin Parkway (part)

A boulevard contains central lanes for through-going traffic and two access lanes for local traffic. Boulevards have ample sidewalks, occur primarily in developed areas, and can be fronted by a variety of uses, including residences. Bicycles may be in a path, shared-use lane, mixed with traffic in an access lane, or all three. Boulevards can handle a great deal of traffic while still providing high-quality commercial, office and residential frontage along the access lanes. Boulevards have long rows of trees which make them attractive and comfortable places to be as well as pass-through.

Figure 4a. Sample Boulevard Street Section with Separated Bike Path.


Figure 4b. Sample Boulevard Street Section – Transit Option.

Figure 4b. Sample Boulevard Street Section – Transit Option.


Rural Boulevard Street Section

Rural Boulevard Street Section with Separated Shared Use Path

Parkways: Blanco Rd., Eastside Parkway, Eucalyptus Rd., Imjin Parkway (part), Intergarrison Rd., Reservation Rd., South Boundary Rd.

A parkway is a regional facility intended to carry traffic from point to point with little interruption in the way of driveways and intersections. Parkways can occur in rural contexts or on the edge of urban places. Parkways respect the natural environment, with a more informal landscape scheme in keeping with their rural setting. Parkways can have two or four travel lanes, with a target speed of between 30 and 45 mph. Bicycles and pedestrians are accommodated on a separated shared use path, but within the overall right-of-way. The configuration of a Parkway can change according to local context and in keeping with environmental restrictions. Vehicle travel lanes of 12 to 14 feet are to be avoided because they will encourage highway speeds and lead to potentially lethal outcomes.

Parkway Street Section

Parkway Street Section with Separated Shared Use Path


Two-Sided Trail Parkway Street Section

Two-Sided Trail Parkway Street Section


Figure 7b. Two-Sided Trail Parkway Street Section – Option 1: Two Lane Road with Cycle Track; Figure 7c. Two-Sided Trail Parkway Street Section – Option 2: Walking and Cycle Facilities.

Table 1. BRP Roadway Design Standards, Figure 4.2-4 and RUDG Regional Circulation Corridor Relationships

RUDG REGIONAL CIRCULATION CORRIDORSLANESURBAN/RURALTYPEBRP FIG 4.2-4SAMPLE SECTIONS
2ND AVE4UrbanArterial4-Lane Urban ArterialAvenue
BLANCO RD4RuralArterial4-Lane Rural ArterialParkway
CALIFORNIA AVE2UrbanCollector2-Lane Urban CollectorAvenue
EASTSIDE PARKWAY
(CSUMB TO EUCALYPTUS RD)
2RuralArterial2-Lane Rural ArterialParkway
EASTSIDE PARKWAY (INTERGARRISON RD TO CSUMB)4RuralArterial4-Lane Rural ArterialParkway
EUCALYPTUS RD2RuralArterial2-Lane Rural ArterialParkway
GEN JIM MOORE BLVD4UrbanArterial4-Lane Urban ArterialBoulevard
GIGLING RD4UrbanArterial4-Lane Urban ArterialBoulevard
IMJIN PARKWAY
(IMJIN RD TO HIGHWAY 1)
4UrbanArterial4-Lane Urban ArterialBoulevard
IMJIN PARKWAY (RESERVATION RD TO IMJIN RD)2UrbanArterial2-Lane Urban ArterialParkway
INTER-GARRISON RD
(7TH AVE TO EASTSIDE PARKWAY)
2RuralCollector2-Lane Rural CollectorParkway
INTER-GARRISON RD (EASTSIDE PARKWAY TO RESERVATION RD)4UrbanArterial4-Lane Urban ArterialParkway
LIGHTFIGHTER DR4UrbanArterial4-Lane Urban ArterialBoulevard
RESERVATION RD4RuralArterial4-Lane Rural ArterialParkway
SOUTH BOUNDARY RD2RuralArterial2-Lane Rural ArterialParkway

Town & Village Centers

Local Residential Streets
Local residential streets provide access to individual lots, accommodate pedestrians and serve as low speed bicycle and vehicle routes. Local residential streets are relatively short in total distance related to the other street types, and serve as the street that residential development fronts. The streetscape is more formal, with street trees planted with regular spacing, and sidewalks on both sides of the street.

Figure 8. Sample Local Residential, Single Family Street Section.

Figure 8. Sample Local Residential, Single Family Street Section.


Figure 9. Sample Local Residential, Multi-Family Street Section.

Figure 9. Sample Local Residential, Multi-Family Street Section.

Main Streets

Main Streets are highly walkable and serve as the primary street for commercial or mixed-use centers. On-street parking can be provided in either a parallel or angled configuration (though rear-in angle parking is safest for cyclists). Given the anticipated pedestrian activity, design speeds are kept low. This condition also allows bicycles to share space with automobiles in travel lanes, reducing the need for distinct bike lanes. However, distinct bike lanes are always the safest option in cases when sufficient width is available. Additional landscaping and traffic calming techniques that are ideal on Main Streets include street trees in grated wells, curb bulb-outs, and a relatively high density of street furniture and public art. Install pedestrian-scale street lighting, and locate utilities underground, in alleys or along other streets to the greatest extent possible. Sidewalks are recommended on both sides of the street, and be placed at least 16 feet from the back of curb to the building face, to provide space for activities such as outdoor cafes and strolling.

Figure 10. Sample Main Street Section 1.

Figure 10. Sample Main Street Section 1.


Figure 11. Sample Main Street Section 2.


Figure 12. Sample Main Street Section 3 (when parking on only one side is possible).

Figure 13. Sample Main Street Section 4.

Figure 13. Sample Main Street Section 4.